Covid19 News

Donald Trump Jr. positive; Thanksgiving travel not advised


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A coronavirus vaccine might not be widely available until several months into 2021.

USA TODAY

The U.S reported a record high of more than 195,000 new daily cases of COVID-19 Friday, the same week the nation surpassed 250,000 deaths from the coronavirus, by far the largest total in the world. Experts say it will get worse.

“Cases and deaths continue to increase steadily in most states,” a Thursday Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation briefing says. “The pace of increase is faster than we expected, leading us to revise upward our forecast of deaths by March 1 to 471,000.”

The influential model’s projections assume 40 states will reinstate social distancing mandates by that time. If they don’t, IHME researchers say deaths and cases will be even higher.

Meanwhile, numerous high-profile political figures including Donald Trump Jr. have tested positive for COVID-19 in recent days. Florida Sen. Rick Scott announced Friday he has tested positive. He is the second Republican senator, along with Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa, to announce positive tests this week.

And Rudy Giuliani’s son, Andrew, announced Friday he has tested positive for COVID-19, a day after he attended a news conference with his father and other members of President Donald Trump’s legal team alleging baseless claims of widespread election fraud.

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has reported more than 11.9 million cases and more than 254,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The global totals: 57.6 million cases and 1.37 million deaths. 

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak in your state.

This file will be updated throughout the day. For updates in your inbox, subscribe to The Daily Briefing newsletter.

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Kansas counties that opted out of face mask order saw COVID-19 cases rise

We already know that wearing face masks in public spaces slows the spread of COVID-19. And now the coronavirus situation in Kansas is providing further proof.

Gov. Laura Kelly issued a face mask mandate in early July, and the counties that upheld the order saw a decline in cases, while the counties that opted out saw cases rise, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Friday.

“Countywide mask mandates appear to have contributed to the mitigation of COVID-19 transmission in mandated counties,” according to the report, which analyzed county-level data one month before, and after, the governor’s mandate went into effect.

As of mid-August, 24 of Kansas’s 105 counties had abided by the state mandate or adopted their own mask mandate, and 81 counties had opted out, as Kansas law allows. At that time, the number of new daily cases per capita – calculated as a 7-day rolling average – had decreased an average of 6% among counties with a mask mandate and increased by 100% in counties without a mandate. Read more.

Canada’s largest city going back on lockdown

The province of Ontario announced Friday that Toronto and the surrounding Peel Region will go into lockdown on Monday. 

Premier Doug Ford and health officials say they won’t allow indoor organized events or social gatherings except for members of the same household. Restaurants and bars will only be allowed to offer takeout and delivery. Retail will only be open for curbside pickup or delivery except for big box stores. 

The stricter measures come as Ontario reports 1,418 new cases of COVID-19 Friday, including 393 in Toronto and 400 new cases in Peel Region. Ontario Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. David Williams says Ontario flattened the epidemic curve before and he’s confident it can be done again.

Meanwhile, Russia on Saturday reported a new daily high in infections and deaths. North Macedonia declared its first-ever nationwide state of emergency. Japan is scaling back on a government-backed campaign to encourage travel and dining out. And cases are surging in South Korea and New Delhi, India.

– The Associated Press

Family members returning home bring higher risk for Thanksgiving gatherings

At a time when Americans are pondering how to celebrate Thanksgiving safely amid the country’s worst surge in coronavirus cases, many families will be faced with yet another complicating factor: the return home of students.

Colleges and universities have reported 252,000-plus cases since the pandemic began, according to a New York Times tracker. Returning students – whether they lived in dorms or off-campus housing in the fall term – “exponentially increase the risk (of infection),” especially if they take some form of mass transportation to get back home.

That’s the assessment of Dr. Teresa Bartlett, senior medical officer for the claims management firm Sedgwick, who advises companies about medical strategies and safety practices. Like other specialists in the field, Bartlett is concerned that holiday gatherings, combined with pandemic fatigue and the need to move indoors…



Source Website Donald Trump Jr. positive; Thanksgiving travel not advised

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